Back on ‘ABC News Breakfast’

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I was back on (ABC1) News Breakfast with the all-Bev team (Scott Bevan and Beverley O’Conner) for the first time in nearly 2 years. It was on 10 January (took me a while to get up online) during the Open. I was talking about home-ground advantage (or lack thereof) for Australian tennis players. Details below.

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Liam Lenten interviewed on ABC1 News Breakfast about his study (with James Reade, U Reading, UK) on home-court advantage in tennis – specifically, that it is not significant for Australian players, at least for seeds. The interview was recorded during the Australian Open.

Appearance on ‘Stay Tuned’

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I appeared on the ABC3 teen-oriented music program Stay Tuned on September 14, discussing fame in the music industry.

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Liam Lenten on the teen-music variety show “Stay Tuned” on ABC3 (season 2, episode 17), using elements of his study (with Jordi McKenzie, University of Sydney) on determinants of JJJ Hottest 100 success, to help hosts Joel Phillips and Nicole Singh answer the question: “Who is the Most Famous Person in the Music Industry?”.

Interview with La Trobe Vice-Chancellor, Professor John Dewar

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I recently recorded a video (on 23 August) with my boss, discussing a selection of important issues and challenges facing LTU.

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The Vice-Chancellor of La Trobe University, Professor John Dewar, is interviewed by Liam Lenten (Senior Lecturer, School of Economics) about such issues as: internal policy initiatives; workload management systems; university initiatives for sport; expansion of student numbers; and university rankings and their implications.

Recent Appearance on ABC Brisbane News

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I recently appeared on the ABC nightly Brisbane News (6 September), talking about bidding for NRL State of Origin hosting rights.

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ABC1 (Brisbane) Nightly News Bulletin: Liam Lenten offers opinion on reports of ARL decision to sell hosting rights of one State of Origin game every two years to highest bidder (even if not Sydney or Brisbane).

Football Penalties BEFORE Extra-Time? Dr Jan Libich and I Assess the Proposal

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I recently recorded a video (description below) that follows from a previous post on 16 July 2010.

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FIFA President Sepp Blatter called penalty shootouts in football (soccer) a “tragedy”. Dr Jan Libich interviews me about our study (also co-authored by Dr Petr Stehlik) assessing an alternative rule: to stage the penalty shootout BEFORE (rather than after) extra-time. The study can be downloaded at www.janlibich.com/penalties.pdf. This video was recorded on 31 August 2012.

My Research Project Description: Short Video

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As part of the La Trobe Research series, on 17 May, I recorded a short video (description below) discussing a current research project of mine: “Unbalanced Scheduling Systems and Demand for Professional Sport” (with Jordi McKenzie, University of Sydney).

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Researchers of La Trobe University are asked three questions, giving a glimpse into the wide range of research conducted at La Trobe. Researchers are asked: In the simplest terms, please explain your research hypothesis? What is the key outcome you hope you achieve? How will this outcome impact society or the community?

My ‘Big FAT Ideas’ Presentation: A ‘Super’ Drugs in Sport Policy

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I made a recorded presentation on 22 March (description below) for La Trobe University’s new initiative: Big FAT Ideas – kind of like a local version of the TEDs. I centred it on some thoughts I had about anti-doping policy.

It ended up getting a good media run, with a radio interview on ABC Melbourne (774 AM, with Red Symons) on the earlier that day; and in Sopie Gosper’s Weekend Australian piece: “Super Idea to Make Drug Cheats Pay for Crimes” on Saturday 24 March.

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Performance enhancing drugs are a part of professional sport and despite harsh penalties for those who are caught, the incentive to outsmart detection remains high. Applying economic theory to this problem might help us develop an effective disincentive to cheat by implementing a superannuation style delay on prize money.